4.5 Star Review · African American · book review · relationships · Youth/Young Adult

‘Ain’t Gonna Be the Same Fool Twice’ by April Sinclair(a review)

ain't gonna be the smae fool twice, yellow book covers
Ain’t Gonna Be the Same Fool Twice by April Sincalir

Book Details: Ain’t Gonna Be the Same Fool Twice by April Sinclair

Published: Open Road Integrated Media(1996)

Cover Design: Kat Lee(for ebook version)

ISBN: 978-1-5040-1866-1

Read on Freading app

4.5 stars

***************************************

Keywords: African American-Human sexuality-college age-Chicago-San Francisco-Women’s Studies-Lesbianism

Book quotes yellow background
Designed by Ericajean using Canva

April Sinclair has done it again with Ain’t Gonna Be the Same Fool Twice, her follow up to Coffee Will Make You Black.

Jean Stevenson or “Stevie” has left high school with hopes of becoming a journalist while also still exploring her sexuality and how it could connect to her being black in the 70s.

In high school, she crushed on a white nurse(In the first book) and began questioning herself then, even though she had sex with a boy before. Even in college, Stevie dates men but soon she realizes there is more to her relationships than just sex. Racism, religion, and politics become a part of the stretching fabric of her life.

Stevie eventually finds herself in a few female relationships and she calls it “experimenting” yet those who care about her wonder if she is sure about any of her decisions. Recalling quotes from a loving grandmother and living in San Francisco with a homosexual hottie named Sterling, Stevie will need to muster all the courage and common sense she was taught just to survive.

My Reaction:

This book was just as good as the first! If you are someone who shies away from topics like lesbianism and racism with a dash of politics, then you may want to run. I am not into politics or sexuality topics like either, but the story was good.

A lot of Stevie’s experiences, sadly, has not changed in reality for 2016.

For example, when Stevie begins dating an attractive white female, they are stopped by the police and the police assumes Stevie is a black male and never once looks at her, he constantly asks if her girlfriend is okay. Unfortunately for Stevie, her white girlfriend is only offended when he calls her “ma’am”. This is Stevie’s crucial eye opener to the climate of the times she is in.

I enjoy Stevie’s personality and her wise mannerism to a degree. She can come off as scathing and wishy washy at the same time; most moments and even with a scathing, stern personality, she can become a rug for someone else even when she knows better. Her friends left much to be desire. I cared for no one really in California. The portrayal of the city she was in was one where people hold on to inhibitions, freedom and weed, but let go of sense and sensitivity.

All  in all I give this an exceptional rating. It was a perfect follow up to Coffee Will Make You Black.

Okay, bookworms! Would you ever read a book like this? What are some books you loved that had very sensitive topics for you? Discuss below and remember to share this post with your friends!

Advertisements

Comment and Join the Discussion!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s